Steven Seagal training Anderson Silva Video

Donald Lee Wilkey

A Steven Seagal fan
To my estimation of aikido being very effective in a small area or cage, it appears to be possible to defend one's self and walk away the winner in the ring. Sensei Steven Seagal proves this in this video with Silva, and makes it seem effortless to go up against a muscle bound fighter in the street or in the ring. Great video update from youtube on Sensei Steven Seagal's aikido
 
Donald Lee Wilkey;203740 said:
Ryan,
see thats what sucks about MMA, they wanna call it ultimate fighting, but they won't allow for joint manipulation. I find that very disturbing and discriminating inside a ring or cagematch. One can beat the other person to a bloody-pulp, but one can't manipulate a tendon, ligament, and joint to the 'point of tapping out', whats up with that? :confused:

Donald,

I completely understand them not allowing small joint manipulation. It's a sport, and as such it has to have rules to make it competitive and less "brutal". The reason they instituted weight classes and so many rules is because MMA was essentially banned because of the brutality. They couldn't even get on PPV at one point in time I believe.

It is far easier to apply a technique on a larger joint (elbow, knee or shoulder) and induce the other competitor to "tap out" without doing permanent damage. Applying a wrist-lock or a finger-lock is far more likely to result in a break because the joints are so small and there is less leeway.

Take the arm-bar (Juji-Gatame in Judo) that is so common in MMA for example. If the technique is applied quickly with full force it is not likely to result in a break. A break is possible, but more than likely the worst injury that will occur before the recipient can tap-out is a hyper-extension of the elbow joint.

In contrast, applying a "small-joint" lock quickly and with force can easily cause a break that could result in the recipient being unable to compete for a great deal of time. I know someone who was the unfortunate recipient of a wrist-lock from an a-hole who had no business instructing. His wrist was broken in two places and required surgery and metal pins to reconstruct. To this day he has issues receiving any techniques on that wrist.

The rules instituted in MMA are designed to allow freedom of technique, but without risking permanent damage to the fighters.

However, I do have to say I disagree with the notion that Aikido is completely worthless in the ring. There are numerous techniques that I think would compliment a fighter's skill-set and not violate any rules. Distancing, entering (irimi) and receiving skills (think uke-nagashi) would be quite useful in my opinion.

One thing you have to keep in mind is that there are Aikido techniques that are similarly practiced in other arts like Judo and BJJ, which are popular "bases" for MMA competitors. I lived in Japan for 15 years and attended numerous Pride events and witnessed Judo fighters use techniques almost identical to Aikido's ikkyo, hiji-otoshi, etc.

While I agree that the fancy throws Aikido is famous for (think uke-nagashi tenkan to a big kotegaeshi) will never be seen in a ring, I think it's short-sighted to say that Aikido training would have no benefit.

With the talent Anderson Silva has, if he dedicated a couple years to Aikido training I think we would see some very interesting things happen in the ring. At this point I wouldn't be shocked to see a nice, hard Shuto make an appearance when he fights Chael Sonen...

P.S. - Apologies if my Aikido terminology is a bit off. I practice Hakko-Ryu Aikijujutsu (also a Daito Ryu derivative) and there are some differences in the names of techniques. For example, we say shodan, nidan, and sandan instead of ikkyo, nikyo, and sankyo.
 

Donald Lee Wilkey

A Steven Seagal fan
Ryan of Yamaguchi;203669 said:
I think one of the more interesting parts is at the 4:00 minute mark. It's dark so I can't see well but it looks like he takes Silva down with kotegaeshi. One of the big criticisms I hear about the Aiki arts is that the techniques can't be performed if a person doesn't throw a "zombie" bunch and then leave their arm out.

You'll notice that Silva punches and snaps it right back in pretty quickly. Despite that, Seagal has no problem getting a hold of it easily.

He was also focusing a lot on the shuto strike to the neck (knife hand). I think this is interesting as well as if it is performed correctly it can easily be a knock out blow. I can attest for this first-hand as I've been sent face first into the dojo floor.


Concurred. Aikido does look like it'd be effective in close-quarter combat atmospheres, given the right aikidoka for the tight-fit self-defense situation
 

Donald Lee Wilkey

A Steven Seagal fan
Ryan of Yamaguchi;203749 said:
Donald,

I completely understand them not allowing small joint manipulation. It's a sport, and as such it has to have rules to make it competitive and less "brutal". The reason they instituted weight classes and so many rules is because MMA was essentially banned because of the brutality. They couldn't even get on PPV at one point in time I believe.

It is far easier to apply a technique on a larger joint (elbow, knee or shoulder) and induce the other competitor to "tap out" without doing permanent damage. Applying a wrist-lock or a finger-lock is far more likely to result in a break because the joints are so small and there is less leeway.

Take the arm-bar (Juji-Gatame in Judo) that is so common in MMA for example. If the technique is applied and force is quickly and fully applied it is not likely to result in a break. A break is possible, but more than likely the worst injury that will occur before the recipient can tap-out is a hyper-extension of the elbow joint.

In contrast applying a small-joint lock quickly and with force can easily result in a break that could result in the recipient unable to compete for a great deal of time. I know of an individual who was the unfortunate recipient of a wrist-lock from an a-hole who had no business instructing. His wrist was broken in two places and required surgery and metal pins to reconstruct. To this day he has issues receiving any techniques on that wrist.

The rules instituted in MMA are designed to allow freedom of technique, but without risking permanent damage to the fighters.

I do have to say I disagree with the notion that Aikido is completely worthless in the ring. There are numerous techniques that I think would compliment a fighters skill-set and not violate any rules. Distancing, entering (irimi) and receiving skills (think uke-nagashi) would be quite useful in my opinion.

One thing you have to keep in mind is that there are Aikido that are similarly practiced in other arts like Judo and BJJ which are popular bases for MMA competitors. I lived in Japan for 15 years and attended numerous Pride events and witnessed Judo fighters use techniques almost identical to Aikido's ikkyo, hiji-otoshi, etc.

While I agree that the fancy throws Aikido is famous for (think uke-nagashi tenkan to a big kotegaeshi) will never be seen in a ring, I think it's short-sighted to say that Aikido training would have no benefit.

With the talent Anderson Silva has, if he dedicated a couple years to Aikido training I think we would see some very interesting things happen in the ring. At this point I wouldn't be shocked to see a nice, hard Shuto make an appearance when he fights Chael Sonen...

P.S. - Apologies if my Aikido terminology is a bit off. I practice Hakko-Ryu Aikijujutsu (also a Daito Ryu derivative) and there are some differences in the names of techniques. For example, we say shodan, nidan, and sandan instead of ikkyo, nikyo, and sankyo.


Ryan of Yamaguchi,
thank you for your insight of aikido training, it's helping me to see the light in different aspects that I've never known nor studied on a scholastical approach as I am a beginner of aikido
 

latinojazz

Member
The clip is awesome, Seagal is amazing...yeah, he is very fat...but in this traing video he is still a pretty cool mother****er!
 

Seagal1969

Active Member
I know what Crissy wante to tell us!

After the fight Anderson Silva got a hug from his friend Steven Seagal.
Someone in the forum only said that the greatest thing about the fight was the Seagal/Silva hug.
The member of the forum only aked whether someone saw the hug..-that´s all.

By the way, Anderson Silva was 2 minutes away from losing the fight. He got beaten up very badly for nearly 5 rounds.

Then 2 minutes before the end of the fight Anderson Silva got Sonnen in a triangle choke and armbar.

Sonnen tapped out and Silva won the fight.
 

Chrissy

Member
[QUOTE = Donald Lee Wilkey ; 204195 ] Chrissy
der Link nicht laden? : Confused : Was ist der Link zur Folge ? [/ QUOTE]



Excuse to everybody. However, yesterday there functioned this link.
Steven and other people is to be seen on a photo in the changing room. I think it was before the fight. I try to find this once more.

Chrissy
 

Seagal1969

Active Member
There´s a short video where you can see Anderson Silva on his way in the ring. Seagal goes after him. Then Silva stopped and hugged Seagal.
You can see the video on youtube:

Seagal: Estilo Mafioso
 
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